Juicing and Raw Foods

June 20, 2012
How to Store Your Juices

What’s the best way to store your juices and how long can you store them?

The best advice is to NOT store your juices at all since the best quality and nutrition exists right after you juice. Every minute your freshly juiced food is exposed to air it starts to oxidize. Exposure to light will also degrade the juice.

Let’s say you really need to store your juices for later consumption. You will want to use any method you can to make sure there is no air in the container and you should use glass or stainless steel and fill the juice to the brim. Let it overflow if needed to minimize air in your container.  Mason Jars are typically used to store juices. Store your juice in a fridge.

Low RPM Juicers vs Centrifugal Juicers produce less degraded Juice and thus store better.  The taste of the juice is better too.

How long can you store the juice?

This will depend on the type of juice, conditions of the juicing process and quality of the food prior to juicing. All these things will effect how quickly your juice will degrade once stored. Typically no more than 24 hours. At best 72 hours, but after that forget about it. I would not even recommend more than 48 hours to be honest. Citrus juices will last longer than green juices or tomato juice. Do not attempt to freeze your juices. I know you where thinking that. The freezing process destroys the juice.

(added)

People do freeze their juice or attempt to but degradation of the nutrients still occurs and by freezing you are not only changing the taste once thawed but also degradation still occurs and the color and texture is different. Some juices, like apple cider, will last longer. Freezing should be a last resort at best.

“Pasteurized juice” with preservatives can be stored longer and is what you find at your local store however the pasteurization process destroys most of the nutrients. It’s still healthier than many alternatives but the taste is not as good and will not give you the health benefits of fresh juice.

You can buy certain frozen juice at the store, however you do not get the nutritional benefits and they typically contain more sugar and preservatives.

What you can freeze

You can however freeze the veggies and fruit BEFORE they are juiced. Once juiced you really need to drink it right away. The idea behind fresh juice vs store bought is that the nutritional value and taste is vastly better.

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May 18, 2012
Benefits of Pineapple Juice
Pineapple is one of my favorite things to juice or eat raw. It just tastes great.  One of the most nutritious juices is fresh pineapple, as it contains many essential vitamins and minerals, such as vitamin C, Thiamine, vitamin B6, Manganese, Potassium, and Magnesium. I must stress the word "fresh" as processed pineapple juice is usually mixed with lots of sugar and many other unhealthy synthetic preservatives. You can gain as much as 75% of the daily recommended allowance of vitamin C which is vital to increasing the body's natural resistance to disease and in promoting cell growth and development which aids tissue repair. Without vitamin C, our bodies could not produce collagen, an essential protein responsible for the creation of our skin, scar tissue, ligaments, tendons, and blood vessels.  Vitamin C is one of the mos t important regenerative elements we can put into our bodies. Pineapple juice also contains a good dose of Potassium and Thiamine. You can't go wrong with Pineapple Juice. 
 
Pineapples also contain bromelain, a proteolytic enzyme that helps us to digest protein, prevent blood clot formation, and aids us as ananti-inflammatory to help reduce swelling, arthritis, and numerous other issues.

How can you tell if a pineapple is ripe?

Pineapple fruit is ripe when it has developed a goldish tint, smells sweet and is slightly soft to the touch.

pineapplesWhere do pineapples come from?

Pineapples are indigenous to South America and is said to originate from the area between Southern Brazil and Paraguay. The natives of southern Brazil and Paraguay spread the pineapple throughout South America, and it eventually reached the Caribbean. Columbus discovered it in 1493 in the Indies and brought it back with him to Europe thus making the pineapple the first bromeliad to leave the New World.The Spanish introduced it into the Philippines, Hawaii (introduced in the early 19th century, first commercial plantation 1886), Zimbabwe and Guam.

Although it was discovered by Captain Cook, John Kidwell is credited with the introduction of the pineapple industry in Hawaii. Large-scale pineapple cultivation by U.S. companies began in the early 1900s on Hawaii. Among the most famous and influential pineapple industrialists was James Dole,who moved to Hawaii in 1899 and started a pineapple plantation in 1900. The companies Dole and Del Monte began growing pineapple on the island of Oahu.

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April 6, 2012
Grapefruit Juice for Weight Loss

Grapefruit juice aids in more efficient metabolism of sugars and has a high fiber content with a low glycemic load.  It has been proven that a person can eat large quantities of food without consuming too many calories by choosing foods high in fiber and water content such as fruit, vegetables, whole grains, legumes and soups.

In a study by the Nutrition and Metabolic Research Center at Scripps Clinic, researchers have confirmed that the simple act of adding grapefruit and grapefruit juice to one's diet can result in weight loss. The grapefruit diet has been around since the 1930s.

Grapefruit juice also enhances the body’s absorption of coQ10, an energy compound vital to our cells and boosts the anti-cancer effect of certain drugs.

Scientific study: A U.S. study looked at the benefits of grapefruit by dividing 100 obese people into three groups: one group was given half a grapefruit before each meal, another had a glass of grapefruit juice, while the remaining third had no grapefruit.

Red grapefruit

After 12 weeks, those eating grapefruit had lost an average of 3.6lb and those drinking grapefruit juice lost an average of 3.3lb. But those in the control group who consumed no grapefruit lost only an average of 0.5lb.

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