Juicing and Raw Foods

June 20, 2012
How to Store Your Juices

What’s the best way to store your juices and how long can you store them?

The best advice is to NOT store your juices at all since the best quality and nutrition exists right after you juice. Every minute your freshly juiced food is exposed to air it starts to oxidize. Exposure to light will also degrade the juice.

Let’s say you really need to store your juices for later consumption. You will want to use any method you can to make sure there is no air in the container and you should use glass or stainless steel and fill the juice to the brim. Let it overflow if needed to minimize air in your container.  Mason Jars are typically used to store juices. Store your juice in a fridge.

Low RPM Juicers vs Centrifugal Juicers produce less degraded Juice and thus store better.  The taste of the juice is better too.

How long can you store the juice?

This will depend on the type of juice, conditions of the juicing process and quality of the food prior to juicing. All these things will effect how quickly your juice will degrade once stored. Typically no more than 24 hours. At best 72 hours, but after that forget about it. I would not even recommend more than 48 hours to be honest. Citrus juices will last longer than green juices or tomato juice. Do not attempt to freeze your juices. I know you where thinking that. The freezing process destroys the juice.

(added)

People do freeze their juice or attempt to but degradation of the nutrients still occurs and by freezing you are not only changing the taste once thawed but also degradation still occurs and the color and texture is different. Some juices, like apple cider, will last longer. Freezing should be a last resort at best.

“Pasteurized juice” with preservatives can be stored longer and is what you find at your local store however the pasteurization process destroys most of the nutrients. It’s still healthier than many alternatives but the taste is not as good and will not give you the health benefits of fresh juice.

You can buy certain frozen juice at the store, however you do not get the nutritional benefits and they typically contain more sugar and preservatives.

What you can freeze

You can however freeze the veggies and fruit BEFORE they are juiced. Once juiced you really need to drink it right away. The idea behind fresh juice vs store bought is that the nutritional value and taste is vastly better.

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May 30, 2012

Kristina Carrillo-Bucaram of Rawfully Organic (www.rawfullyorganic.com) and FullyRaw (www.fullyraw.com) shows you Easy Raw Food Storage Tips! Founder and chief co-operator of Rawfully Organic, the largest raw foods non-profit produce co-operative in the US. Kristina created ROC because she was able to overcome hyperglycemia by eating a 100% raw foods diet. Today, she maintains this lifestyle, and she not only make a living educating others on how to do this, but also manages handling a LOT…a LOT…a LOT of produce daily. After having been raw for almost 7 years and after having run Rawfully Organic for almost 5 of these years, storing and organizing produce has become an art form for Kristina, and it is something in which considers herself a mastermind! In this video, she shares with you 6 easy tips to help you organize your refrigerator when storing raw produce and when figuring out how to organize your foods when going raw! 1) Bag Your Greens to Keep Them Fresh 2) Learn to Rotate Your Food 3) Store Fruits and Veggies Separately 4) Don’t Block the Air Vents & Keep Temperature Consistent at 40F 5) Prepare as Needed 6) Real Food Does Not Last Forever! Being FullyRaw is a choice and a lifestyle. Make it a success, not a struggle.

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May 18, 2012
Benefits of Pineapple Juice
Pineapple is one of my favorite things to juice or eat raw. It just tastes great.  One of the most nutritious juices is fresh pineapple, as it contains many essential vitamins and minerals, such as vitamin C, Thiamine, vitamin B6, Manganese, Potassium, and Magnesium. I must stress the word "fresh" as processed pineapple juice is usually mixed with lots of sugar and many other unhealthy synthetic preservatives. You can gain as much as 75% of the daily recommended allowance of vitamin C which is vital to increasing the body's natural resistance to disease and in promoting cell growth and development which aids tissue repair. Without vitamin C, our bodies could not produce collagen, an essential protein responsible for the creation of our skin, scar tissue, ligaments, tendons, and blood vessels.  Vitamin C is one of the mos t important regenerative elements we can put into our bodies. Pineapple juice also contains a good dose of Potassium and Thiamine. You can't go wrong with Pineapple Juice. 
 
Pineapples also contain bromelain, a proteolytic enzyme that helps us to digest protein, prevent blood clot formation, and aids us as ananti-inflammatory to help reduce swelling, arthritis, and numerous other issues.

How can you tell if a pineapple is ripe?

Pineapple fruit is ripe when it has developed a goldish tint, smells sweet and is slightly soft to the touch.

pineapplesWhere do pineapples come from?

Pineapples are indigenous to South America and is said to originate from the area between Southern Brazil and Paraguay. The natives of southern Brazil and Paraguay spread the pineapple throughout South America, and it eventually reached the Caribbean. Columbus discovered it in 1493 in the Indies and brought it back with him to Europe thus making the pineapple the first bromeliad to leave the New World.The Spanish introduced it into the Philippines, Hawaii (introduced in the early 19th century, first commercial plantation 1886), Zimbabwe and Guam.

Although it was discovered by Captain Cook, John Kidwell is credited with the introduction of the pineapple industry in Hawaii. Large-scale pineapple cultivation by U.S. companies began in the early 1900s on Hawaii. Among the most famous and influential pineapple industrialists was James Dole,who moved to Hawaii in 1899 and started a pineapple plantation in 1900. The companies Dole and Del Monte began growing pineapple on the island of Oahu.

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